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Published articles on the benefits of Dru Yoga

Published articles on the benefits of Dru Yoga

A list of published articles on the benefits of Dru Yoga sorted into categories

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A   Academic research articles on Dru Yoga

  1. McDonald, A., Burjan, E., Martin, S. (2006). Yoga for patients and carers in a palliative day care setting. International Journal of Palliative Nursing, 12(11):519-23. 
    1. This study suggests that Dru yoga benefitted patients (and carers) in palliative care settings. A 12-week Dru Yoga pilot project was introduced into a day care unit and proved to be highly successful.   
    2. Link:   https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17170669
  2. Hartfiel, N., Havenhand, J., Khalsa, S.B., Clarke, G. and Krayer, A. (2011). The effectiveness of yoga for the improvement of well-being and resilience to stress in the workplace. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment, and Health, 37(1):70-76.
    1. A six-week intervention showed that even a short program of Dru yoga was effective for enhancing emotional well-being and resilience to stress in the workplace. The Dru yoga group reported marked improvements in feelings of clear-mindedness, composure, elation, energy, and confidence. In addition, the Dru yoga group reported increased life purpose and satisfaction, and feelings of greater self-confidence during stressful situations.
    2. Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20369218
  3. Hartfiel, N., Burton, C., Rycroft-Malone, J., Clarke, G., Havenhand, J., Khalsa, S.B. and Edwards, R.T. (2012). Yoga for reducing perceived stress and back pain at work. Occupational Medicine, (62)8:606-612. 
    1. In comparison to the control group, the Dru yoga group reported significant reductions in perceived stress and back pain, and a substantial improvement in psychological well-being. When compared with the control group at the end of the programme, the yoga group scores were significantly lower for perceived stress, back pain, sadness and hostility, and substantially higher for feeling self-assured, attentive and serene. 
    2. Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23012344
  4. Brukner, P., Nealon, A., Morgan, C., Burgess, D. and Dunn, A. (2014) Recurrent hamstring muscle injury: applying the limited evidence in the professional football setting with a seven-point programme. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 48:929-938.
    1. In this case study, Dru Yoga was practised by a professional footballer who sustained five hamstring injuries in a relatively short period of time. The injury was managed successfully with a seven-point programme which included regular sessions of Dru Yoga. These consisted of Dru fascial warm-up techniques; intense hamstring and low back stretches; guided Dru relaxations and Dru breath training (techniques to improve lung capacity, stamina and to activate the relaxation response through the body). The player soon reported subjective improvement in his hamstring freedom.
    2. Link:   https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23322894
  5. Timlin, D. and Simpson, E. (2017). A preliminary randomised control trial of the effects of Dru yoga on psychological well-being in Northern Irish first time mothers. Midwifery, 46:29-36.
    1. This study showed that Dru yoga improved the psychological well-being of first time mothers, reduced educed global stress levels, decreased negative affect and dysfunctional coping, enhanced problem focused coping, and could be recommended to improve health and fitness in the postpartum.
    2. Link:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28129548
  6. Hartfiel, N., Clarke, G., Havenhand, J., Phillips, C. and Edwards, R.T. (2017). Cost-effectiveness of yoga for managing musculoskeletal conditions in the workplace. Occupational Medicine, 67(9):687-695.
    1. This study showed that an eight week Dru yoga programme, with a 6-month follow-up, for National Health Service (NHS) employees was effective for improving quality of life and reducing sickness absence due to back pain and musculoskeletal conditions. The results showed that Dru yoga is likely to be cost-effective for the NHS.
    2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29202204
  7. Hartfiel, N. and Edwards, R.T. (2017). Yoga in the workplace can reduce back pain and sickness absence. The Conversation.
    1. The results of this study showed NHS staff who participated in an eight week Dru Yoga programme had larger reductions in back pain compared to a control group. After six months, employee staff records showed that the yoga participants had 20 times less sick leave due to musculoskeletal conditions (including back pain) than the control group. NHS staff who practiced Dru yoga during the six month study visited health professionals for back pain only half as often as control group participants.
    2. Link:   https://theconversation.com/yoga-in-the-workplace-can-reduce-back-pain-a...
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